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Layne1727

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35 years ago, Joy Division did their last show at High Hall, Birmingham University

To celebrate, nothing better than their only live recording of Decades (that we know, I hope) 



Long live, Joy Division [smile][smile][smile]

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Atarubarreau

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Layne1727
35 years ago, Joy Division did their last show at High Hall, Birmingham University

To celebrate, nothing better than their only live recording of Decades (that we know, I hope) 



Long live, Joy Division [smile][smile][smile]


I never been a fan of that gig at all; which is a shame because I love every songs chosed for... But I don't know, to me, it feels like Ian Curtis' already far away.

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Layne1727

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atarubarreau
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layne1727
35 years ago, Joy Division did their last show at High Hall, Birmingham University

To celebrate, nothing better than their only live recording of Decades (that we know, I hope) 



Long live, Joy Division [smile][smile][smile]
I never been a fan of that gig at all; which is a shame because I love every songs chosed for... But I don't know, to me, it feels like Ian Curtis' already far away.


I think he knew it that was going to be his last gig, in some ways. The choice of Digital as the last song is like a premonition.

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Atarubarreau

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Layne1727
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atarubarreau
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layne1727
35 years ago, Joy Division did their last show at High Hall, Birmingham University

To celebrate, nothing better than their only live recording of Decades (that we know, I hope) 



Long live, Joy Division [smile][smile][smile]
I never been a fan of that gig at all; which is a shame because I love every songs chosed for... But I don't know, to me, it feels like Ian Curtis' already far away.


I think he knew it that was going to be his last gig, in some ways. The choice of Digital as the last song is like a premonition.

Yeah I do think so. (Digital is such a perfect song >< )

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TJ

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Reply with quote  #5 
We'll ignore the fact that they had three other gigs scheduled then, that had to be cancelled, shall we? The encore tracks were decided in the gap between finishing the set and coming back on, nothing to do with premonitions or any such BS. It just so happened that they chose Digital on this occasion. What if they hadn't played Birmingham? Previous gig ended with a jam with Section 25, does that mean that Ian was thinking of jumping ship or even amalgamating the two bands? No of course not.
Atarubarreau

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ
We'll ignore the fact that they had three other gigs scheduled then, that had to be cancelled, shall we? The encore tracks were decided in the gap between finishing the set and coming back on, nothing to do with premonitions or any such BS. It just so happened that they chose Digital on this occasion. What if they hadn't played Birmingham? Previous gig ended with a jam with Section 25, does that mean that Ian was thinking of jumping ship or even amalgamating the two bands? No of course not.

It's just something "mythical" you know,

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Layne1727

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ
We'll ignore the fact that they had three other gigs scheduled then, that had to be cancelled, shall we? The encore tracks were decided in the gap between finishing the set and coming back on, nothing to do with premonitions or any such BS. It just so happened that they chose Digital on this occasion. What if they hadn't played Birmingham? Previous gig ended with a jam with Section 25, does that mean that Ian was thinking of jumping ship or even amalgamating the two bands? No of course not.
 

I think Ian would "left" Joy Division, like Brian Wilson did with the Beach Boys.
He would contribute with lyrics, though.


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Atarubarreau

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Na, I think he would better be like Sid Barret by making whatever he want until stoping his music career
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PhilC

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The Beach Boys were big stars when Brian Wilson left - Joy Division were not. I really can't see any parallels between the two of them. But who knows what would have happened to Joy Division if Ian hadn't died? If you look at some of their contemporaries, they might have become stadium rockers (U2, Simple Minds), pop stars (Adam and the Ants) or 'cultish goths' (the Banshees).

There are many differences between Ian and Syd Barrett but musically speaking, the biggest difference was that Syd could play instruments and write music as well as lyrics, whereas Ian could play a couple of chords and a few notes on the synth - he'd have needed a musician or two to work with in order to have a solo career.
Atarubarreau

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You always break my theories, but I mean, maybe with another band specially made for the record, and then, stoping music
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Layne1727

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilC
The Beach Boys were big stars when Brian Wilson left - Joy Division were not. I really can't see any parallels between the two of them. But who knows what would have happened to Joy Division if Ian hadn't died? If you look at some of their contemporaries, they might have become stadium rockers (U2, Simple Minds), pop stars (Adam and the Ants) or 'cultish goths' (the Banshees).

There are many differences between Ian and Syd Barrett but musically speaking, the biggest difference was that Syd could play instruments and write music as well as lyrics, whereas Ian could play a couple of chords and a few notes on the synth - he'd have needed a musician or two to work with in order to have a solo career.


Sadly, we'll never know. He said to Stephen once he'd be a librarian. He would become writer, perhaps? As I said, we'll never know.

As for continue his musical career, you said he would need a musician or two. I don't know if he was a experimental/drone fan, but I can imagine he doing this if he were alive (if he liked of course). I remember that I was talking to a friend of mine in this same subject and he said: "Ian would be djing today" [crazy]

He could be right (or not)!

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Recording_silence

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Reply with quote  #12 
While I agree that this was not JD's best ever gig, I will say one thing about it though: I bought "Still" before I bought UP or Closer, and so  my first experience of hearing "Passover" and "Means" was from this gig. The intensity of those recordings played a big part in switching me on to JD, in particular the "I put my trust in you!" line on Means, and the intense guitar/bass interplay of the "break" section on Passover, just after the "I know that I'll lose every....time.." line in verse 2. This was no poncey stage-acting, it was something I had not heard before in any music up until then (nor since then, I might add). (In fact, I was disappointed when I heard the recorded versions on Closer, they didn't have the same power). It still makes me shake my head in puzzlement as to how on earth these four ordinary, jape-loving blokes managed to....I don't know....conjure up this maelstrom.
TJ_Davidson

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Reply with quote  #13 
It's a bit trivial to comment on this, but my two pence about the HH gig.
The gig was pretty shambolic, and the band sound technically ill-prepared (like the out of tune synth) and musically underrehearsed (like Steve missing a beat in Passover, which is pretty bad I'd say).
In that light the prospects for an exhausting US tour were probably not all too great. For Ian, in medical terms, that tour would have most likely been a recipe for disaster.

On a side thought, when New Order did go to the States later on they got their instruments and other gear stolen from their van, which was pretty bad. Had any such thing happened during a JD tour, it would have surely been a signal for Ian to pack it in for good (as unfortunate things already were).
I personally believe that JD wouldn't have lasted to see the end of 1980 anyway and the boys would form New Order without Ian, leaving him behind in order to let him focus on a life less hazardous for an epileptic patient. They were maybe young and naive, but probably not as ignorant not to understand that. The gig at High Hall sounds like a band that has been depleted of their energy. A very sad testimony indeed.
Atarubarreau

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ_Davidson
It's a bit trivial to comment on this, but my two pence about the HH gig. The gig was pretty shambolic, and the band sound technically ill-prepared (like the out of tune synth) and musically underrehearsed (like Steve missing a beat in Passover, which is pretty bad I'd say). In that light the prospects for an exhausting US tour were probably not all too great. For Ian, in medical terms, that tour would have most likely been a recipe for disaster. On a side thought, when New Order did go to the States later on they got their instruments and other gear stolen from their van, which was pretty bad. Had any such thing happened during a JD tour, it would have surely been a signal for Ian to pack it in for good (as unfortunate things already were). I personally believe that JD wouldn't have lasted to see the end of 1980 anyway and the boys would form New Order without Ian, leaving him behind in order to let him focus on a life less hazardous for an epileptic patient. They were maybe young and naive, but probably not as ignorant not to understand that. The gig at High Hall sounds like a band that has been depleted of their energy. A very sad testimony indeed.

I totally agree with that story too

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porfirio

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Reply with quote  #15 
I think the High Hall gig is great...Amazing versions of A Means to an end...Passover...24 Hours...New Dawn Fades...Shadowplay...and Decades! I mean it was just the perfect gig to make an end on the all damn thing...35 years ago...and the legend lives on...
TJ_Davidson

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The perfect gig...? Uhm....okay.
Atarubarreau

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Quote:
Originally Posted by porfirio
I think the High Hall gig is great...Amazing versions of A Means to an end...Passover...24 Hours...New Dawn Fades...Shadowplay...and Decades! I mean it was just the perfect gig to make an end on the all damn thing...35 years ago...and the legend lives on...


Univecity of London ? Les Bains Douches ? The Lyceum Theatre ? Kant Kino ? (Nah kidding



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Layne1727

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I think they realized how ill Ian was at this gig. After all, 3 other dates were cancelled. At Eric's for example, the gig would take place in the following day.

Sometimes I wonder what would've happened if Joy Division play the other 3 schedules dates. They would play Ceremony and (probaly) Decades again, but without the mic low and with keyboards on tune


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TJ

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ_Davidson
It's a bit trivial to comment on this, but my two pence about the HH gig. The gig was pretty shambolic, and the band sound technically ill-prepared (like the out of tune synth) and musically underrehearsed (like Steve missing a beat in Passover, which is pretty bad I'd say). In that light the prospects for an exhausting US tour were probably not all too great. For Ian, in medical terms, that tour would have most likely been a recipe for disaster. On a side thought, when New Order did go to the States later on they got their instruments and other gear stolen from their van, which was pretty bad. Had any such thing happened during a JD tour, it would have surely been a signal for Ian to pack it in for good (as unfortunate things already were). I personally believe that JD wouldn't have lasted to see the end of 1980 anyway and the boys would form New Order without Ian, leaving him behind in order to let him focus on a life less hazardous for an epileptic patient. They were maybe young and naive, but probably not as ignorant not to understand that. The gig at High Hall sounds like a band that has been depleted of their energy. A very sad testimony indeed.


The synth was prone to overheating, apparently, hence the awful warble on Decades. The soundcheck version was much better. Steve dropped a stick by the sound of it, probably the only mistake I have ever heard him make in over 500 recordings. Can't say that about the rest of them!!
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Some of the performances are great. What sucks is that it is a boring and liveless direct recording from the mixing desk. Esp. the bass sound is crap. No room, no overdrive from the amp like in all those audience recordings. And his active Yamaha Bass sounds much cleaner than the Rick-copy he played before. Same is true for the guitar, but at least the guitar seems to be miced.


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Reply with quote  #21 
I take it you've not heard the audience recording then?
Atarubarreau

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ
I take it you've not heard the audience recording then?

Where could I find it ?

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ_Davidson
It's a bit trivial to comment on this, but my two pence about the HH gig. The gig was pretty shambolic, and the band sound technically ill-prepared (like the out of tune synth) and musically underrehearsed (like Steve missing a beat in Passover, which is pretty bad I'd say). In that light the prospects for an exhausting US tour were probably not all too great. For Ian, in medical terms, that tour would have most likely been a recipe for disaster. On a side thought, when New Order did go to the States later on they got their instruments and other gear stolen from their van, which was pretty bad. Had any such thing happened during a JD tour, it would have surely been a signal for Ian to pack it in for good (as unfortunate things already were). I personally believe that JD wouldn't have lasted to see the end of 1980 anyway and the boys would form New Order without Ian, leaving him behind in order to let him focus on a life less hazardous for an epileptic patient. They were maybe young and naive, but probably not as ignorant not to understand that. The gig at High Hall sounds like a band that has been depleted of their energy. A very sad testimony indeed.


The synth was prone to overheating, apparently, hence the awful warble on Decades. The soundcheck version was much better. Steve dropped a stick by the sound of it, probably the only mistake I have ever heard him make in over 500 recordings. Can't say that about the rest of them!!


He made a mistake during Passover on that last gig. As New Order I saw him doing a fantastic performance when one his sticks fell down on the stage and he continued playing.

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Jumofi

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ_Davidson
It's a bit trivial to comment on this, but my two pence about the HH gig. The gig was pretty shambolic, and the band sound technically ill-prepared (like the out of tune synth) and musically underrehearsed (like Steve missing a beat in Passover, which is pretty bad I'd say). In that light the prospects for an exhausting US tour were probably not all too great. For Ian, in medical terms, that tour would have most likely been a recipe for disaster. On a side thought, when New Order did go to the States later on they got their instruments and other gear stolen from their van, which was pretty bad. Had any such thing happened during a JD tour, it would have surely been a signal for Ian to pack it in for good (as unfortunate things already were). I personally believe that JD wouldn't have lasted to see the end of 1980 anyway and the boys would form New Order without Ian, leaving him behind in order to let him focus on a life less hazardous for an epileptic patient. They were maybe young and naive, but probably not as ignorant not to understand that. The gig at High Hall sounds like a band that has been depleted of their energy. A very sad testimony indeed.


Don't think Ian would leave that easy. The pressure for money would be the guide force.
After that North America Tour, it wouldn't be the same band anymore.

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Reply with quote  #25 
BS Stephen never made any mistakes! He made them all the time. At Paradiso, he came in too early on "Love Will Tear Us Apart," which is why Hooky fucked up the bass line so badly at the beginning. Stephen messed up after the second chorus on the same song at the Malvern gig (April 5, 1980) gig.

There are several songs during the Civic Hall (November 1, 1979) that he screwed up.

Several performances of "Disorder" where he messes up and Hooky waits for him to get the beat down before jumping in.

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