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TheRealJon

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Reply with quote  #1 
There's no accounting for the uniqueness of an individual's taste. The many ingredients that combine to appeal differs from person to person.

Take my musical choices, shaped by a moment in time when I was at my most impressionable and which, I admit, has limited my appreciation of many musical acts because of my unwillingness to grant most contenders with my seal of approval.

Punk started the ball rolling by effectively making 90 percent of everything that had come before it verboten and no longer worthy of ear time. The Kinks, The Doors, The Who and The Velvet Underground just made the cut before my self imposed musical intransigence closed the door - and my ears and mind - to those deemed to be unworthy contenders for my time. From punk, only The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Damned and Siouxsie and the Banshees made it out alive before post-punk took over. Wire, Echo and the Bunnymen, Public Image Limited, The Smiths and the Comsat Angels led the way but it was Joy Division who stirred my soul like no other group.

I was just 16 when Unknown Pleasures was released. The artwork was fascinating. So minimalistic, bleak and yet stylish, just like the music within. The baritone voice of Ian Curtis was the first thing to grab your attention, then the way the bass guitar underpinned every song before the robotic drums and even syndrums stole the show. The guitar, so often the lead instrument elsewhere, was just another item, but no less important, in this unique ensemble.

And then there were the photographs of their grainy black and white world. Masterminds of minimalist publicly, that was all we had to catch a glimpse of Joy Division. Music papers like Sounds or NME were all we had to go on, Oh, and John Peel who we listened to religiously every night from 10pm to midnight.

I could talk all day about Joy Division but these songs are among those that remain the most potent to this 16 year old in the body of a 48 year old, today:

New Dawn Fades  - "A loaded gun won't set you free"
Insight - "I remember when we were young"
Colony - "A cry for help, a hint of anesthesia"
Dead Souls - "They keep calling me"
Passover - "This is the crisis I knew had to come"
Isolation - "These pleasures and wayward distractions"
Twenty Four Hours - "A cloud hangs over me, marks every move"

I can never listen to Joy Division without the lyrics jumping out and ambushing me.

Jim Morrison also does it on some Doors songs. "When The Music's Over" could have been written by Ian Curtis: "Cancel my subscription to the Resurrection, Send my credentials to the House of Detention." Another singer doomed to an early death.

This is the musical heritage that has blinkered me, for ever. Only Radiohead and Elbow among today's groups have really managed to catch my attention. My list of pet hates grows daily. The likes of The Killers and Noah and the Whale, for example, actually turn my stomach. My bias becomes open hatred when I hear such trite nonsense.

Taste - my taste - is all that counts.



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dmxi

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Reply with quote  #2 
hear,hear.....words of truth from a poets soul!



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JDcat4

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hear, hear!
Joy Division were absolutely fantastic!
I just started listening to them a few months ago and I'm obsessed with them.
Favourite songs:
1. Disorder - ace lyrics
2. New Dawn Fades - great guitar
3. Digital - ace bass line
4. Dead Souls - ace lyrics
5. Heart and Soul - ace lyrics
6. She's Lost Control - ace bass line
7. Novelty - ace lyrics
8. Transmission - brilliant guitar solo
9. From Safety to Where...?  - ace lyrics
10. Love Will Tear Us Apart - ace bass line

The way you wrote that does seem rather poetic, but I don't really know much about poems myself. I tried to write poems when I was in school, but they came out as lyrics. So, I think for me, it's "failed poet". I'm very musical anyway.

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porfirio

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Reply with quote  #4 
I dont think JD could be in any way be related to the drug related-hippy subculture of the Doors...Jim Morrison is never mentioned among IC influences: David Bowie and Iggy Pop were much more influential...
Wallflower

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Reply with quote  #5 
Wrong, porfirio. Jim Morrison was one of Ian's major influences. People started comparing JD to The Doors just around the time they were getting serious recognition (February 1980).
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ravachol

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Reply with quote  #6 
The Doors album "Strange Days" was Hannett's (drug related-hippy) model for producing Joy Division. If you understand what Hannett has done and listen to songs like "Riders on the Storm"  not just but mainly from the perspective of a producer and sound engineer it contains a lot of the ideas Hannett followed in the production of Closer and UP. And Ian Curtis and Hannett were very close while Sumner and Hook didn't understand what Hannett was doing back then (read the actual interview with Hook that is discussed here in the forum).
And for me it would be hard to believe that the guy who sings "Candidate" didn't listen a lot to Morrison.

But who am I: I prefer the drug related-hippy subculture anyday against your favourite herrenmenschen-drummer, porfirio, taken from an unfortunate cover idea by Warsaw.


Dirk

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porfirio

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Reply with quote  #7 
This connection between the drug culture and music always puzzled me... I always been very anti drug and anti alcohol since my straight edege teen days... but at the same time I always admired JD, early New Order and other bands who did use drugs as way of inspiration (open the Doors of perception through chimical aid)... I have difficulties in understanding because I believe drugs are a major weapon in the hands of the system to destroy youth's will to react... I prefer to maintain my mind clear and my will strong and my body healthy in order not to be squashed by the system
be_bop_kid

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Reply with quote  #8 
I bought Closer when it came out, having only heard LWTUA on the radio, on the strength of reviews etc. Back in those days you kind of had to buy things if you wanted to hear them.

I immediately loved it and felt as if I'd known it all my life. Love at first sight, I guess.
ravachol

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Reply with quote  #9 
@porfirio
But I guess Bowie and Iggy Pop were as much into drugs, if not even more so, as Morrison was. Not to mention William S. Burroughs...
Esp. into heavy drugs like Heroin. And Iggy Pop admired Morrison as much as Ian Curtis did. I don't know about Bowie. But I see the difference between the poetic Morrison and Bowie/Pop/Lou Reed (another drug user) on the other hand.

I have no opinion about drugs. I'm as afraid of the purism and asceticism of the straight edge movement as I am of hard drugs. I knew that I couldn't stay away from them if I tried them and I've seen people in my youth who were destroyed by heavy drugs, so I never tried them.
Dirk


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dmxi

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Reply with quote  #10 
@dirk

dirk you're german,right?can you have a look here:
http://lwtua.websitetoolbox.com/post/EU-water-privatizesation-6239993
...& spread the word if you agree.


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ravachol

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Reply with quote  #11 
@dmxi
done

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porfirio

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Reply with quote  #12 
ravachol youre right all the "culture" linked to the Burroughs-Keruoac-Ferlinghetti-Ginsberg gang was very much influenced by drug and alcohol abuse...and so are some of my fave writers (like D'Annunzio) and artists (like the pre-raphaelites, Dante Gabriele Rossetti p.e.)
but I still consider the drug culture and alcohol abuse an absolute evil...or maybe even worse a Plot by certain forces of the System to keep the youth away from healthy thinking...its the perfect way to put forces that can react to sleep...in a way that they wont fight the System anymore
the writers musicians and artists who are into drug culture are tools of this evil System
Jumofi

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Love Will Tear Us Apart
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Reply with quote  #13 
Need to agree with Hooky. Their chemistry was amazing. Four musicians making fantastic music.

They sound still fresh to me. Like they had written LWTUA last night for instance.

Have been listening to them for 25 years and they are my favorite band. Did not see them live unfortunately.

Martin Hannett help their music sound ethernal.



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ElizabethBracy

The Kill
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Reply with quote  #14 
Why Joy Division?

This could be as simple as a few sentences or as lengthy as a thesis. Everything coalesced perfectly at that point in time with Joy Division. Ian is one of the top 2 greatest lyricists to ever grace this planet. His poetry speaks to me on an emotional and cerebral level and will live in my soul forever.

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ElizabethBracy

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Reply with quote  #15 
If Unknown Pleasures came out today, it would still sound fresh and new. And there has NEVER been a more magnetic and honest front man than Ian. Truly a reticent poet.
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ElizabethBracy

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRealJon
There's no accounting for the uniqueness of an individual's taste. The many ingredients that combine to appeal differs from person to person.

Take my musical choices, shaped by a moment in time when I was at my most impressionable and which, I admit, has limited my appreciation of many musical acts because of my unwillingness to grant most contenders with my seal of approval.

Punk started the ball rolling by effectively making 90 percent of everything that had come before it verboten and no longer worthy of ear time. The Kinks, The Doors, The Who and The Velvet Underground just made the cut before my self imposed musical intransigence closed the door - and my ears and mind - to those deemed to be unworthy contenders for my time. From punk, only The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Damned and Siouxsie and the Banshees made it out alive before post-punk took over. Wire, Echo and the Bunnymen, Public Image Limited, The Smiths and the Comsat Angels led the way but it was Joy Division who stirred my soul like no other group.

I was just 16 when Unknown Pleasures was released. The artwork was fascinating. So minimalistic, bleak and yet stylish, just like the music within. The baritone voice of Ian Curtis was the first thing to grab your attention, then the way the bass guitar underpinned every song before the robotic drums and even syndrums stole the show. The guitar, so often the lead instrument elsewhere, was just another item, but no less important, in this unique ensemble.

And then there were the photographs of their grainy black and white world. Masterminds of minimalist publicly, that was all we had to catch a glimpse of Joy Division. Music papers like Sounds or NME were all we had to go on, Oh, and John Peel who we listened to religiously every night from 10pm to midnight.

I could talk all day about Joy Division but these songs are among those that remain the most potent to this 16 year old in the body of a 48 year old, today:

New Dawn Fades  - "A loaded gun won't set you free"
Insight - "I remember when we were young"
Colony - "A cry for help, a hint of anesthesia"
Dead Souls - "They keep calling me"
Passover - "This is the crisis I knew had to come"
Isolation - "These pleasures and wayward distractions"
Twenty Four Hours - "A cloud hangs over me, marks every move"

I can never listen to Joy Division without the lyrics jumping out and ambushing me.

Jim Morrison also does it on some Doors songs. "When The Music's Over" could have been written by Ian Curtis: "Cancel my subscription to the Resurrection, Send my credentials to the House of Detention." Another singer doomed to an early death.

This is the musical heritage that has blinkered me, for ever. Only Radiohead and Elbow among today's groups have really managed to catch my attention. My list of pet hates grows daily. The likes of The Killers and Noah and the Whale, for example, actually turn my stomach. My bias becomes open hatred when I hear such trite nonsense.

Taste - my taste - is all that counts.





I think for those of us who speak Ian, his poetry knocks us sideways. I was told by a former flame, "Something in you must be broken to listen to that." I took it as a compliment. :-)



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ElizabethBracy

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRealJon
There's no accounting for the uniqueness of an individual's taste. The many ingredients that combine to appeal differs from person to person.

Take my musical choices, shaped by a moment in time when I was at my most impressionable and which, I admit, has limited my appreciation of many musical acts because of my unwillingness to grant most contenders with my seal of approval.

Punk started the ball rolling by effectively making 90 percent of everything that had come before it verboten and no longer worthy of ear time. The Kinks, The Doors, The Who and The Velvet Underground just made the cut before my self imposed musical intransigence closed the door - and my ears and mind - to those deemed to be unworthy contenders for my time. From punk, only The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Damned and Siouxsie and the Banshees made it out alive before post-punk took over. Wire, Echo and the Bunnymen, Public Image Limited, The Smiths and the Comsat Angels led the way but it was Joy Division who stirred my soul like no other group.

I was just 16 when Unknown Pleasures was released. The artwork was fascinating. So minimalistic, bleak and yet stylish, just like the music within. The baritone voice of Ian Curtis was the first thing to grab your attention, then the way the bass guitar underpinned every song before the robotic drums and even syndrums stole the show. The guitar, so often the lead instrument elsewhere, was just another item, but no less important, in this unique ensemble.

And then there were the photographs of their grainy black and white world. Masterminds of minimalist publicly, that was all we had to catch a glimpse of Joy Division. Music papers like Sounds or NME were all we had to go on, Oh, and John Peel who we listened to religiously every night from 10pm to midnight.

I could talk all day about Joy Division but these songs are among those that remain the most potent to this 16 year old in the body of a 48 year old, today:

New Dawn Fades  - "A loaded gun won't set you free"
Insight - "I remember when we were young"
Colony - "A cry for help, a hint of anesthesia"
Dead Souls - "They keep calling me"
Passover - "This is the crisis I knew had to come"
Isolation - "These pleasures and wayward distractions"
Twenty Four Hours - "A cloud hangs over me, marks every move"

I can never listen to Joy Division without the lyrics jumping out and ambushing me.

Jim Morrison also does it on some Doors songs. "When The Music's Over" could have been written by Ian Curtis: "Cancel my subscription to the Resurrection, Send my credentials to the House of Detention." Another singer doomed to an early death.

This is the musical heritage that has blinkered me, for ever. Only Radiohead and Elbow among today's groups have really managed to catch my attention. My list of pet hates grows daily. The likes of The Killers and Noah and the Whale, for example, actually turn my stomach. My bias becomes open hatred when I hear such trite nonsense.

Taste - my taste - is all that counts.





Ceremony has some of the most beautiful lyrics. It's also one of Ian's more positive songs, to be sure. I would sell a vital organ for a proper recording. 

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albion

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Reply with quote  #18 
^this^


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Elisium

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Reply with quote  #19 

Why Joy Division?..........

I have not posted for what seems like eons but have still 'lurked' on a regular basis, but I thought it time to start posting again, and what better way to begin than by replying to the excellent post which started this thread...... 


I missed Joy Division in the moment however, that did not stop them finding me a short time later, and since that time they have not left me....

It started towards the end of 1982, my musical horizons at that time consisted of a lean towards the 'New Romantic Cold Wave' scene with 'The Associates', 'Talk Talk' and 'Japan'.  I loved the seriousness of the 'Gentlemen Take Polaroids' LP and the pure brilliance of MacKenzie and Rankine's compositions on 'Sulk'.

 

Whilst out with some friends, I heard for the first time 'Love Will Tear Us Apart'.  I knew neither the name of the artist or the song, and did not even hear the song in its entirity.  However, that small segment of music was enough.  There was 'something' there which I knew I had to explore, and I had not experienced such a sudden yearning for a single brief piece of a song ever before.....it was unique.

 

A work colleague who I was with that evening later told me that the song was 'Joy Division - Love Will Tear Us Apart'.  He then subsequently put 3 tracks onto one side of a C-30 cassette tape.  Atmosphere Ice Age and Decades.  I was instantly hooked, the 'something' I had first heard in LWTUA had now been cemented and the die was cast.

 

I devoured anything at all I could find in those pre-internet days.  I was (and remain) completely absorbed by the depth and intensity of the lyrics of Ian Curtis.  After all this time, I never fail to be stunned by the fragile beauty of Atmosphere, the power and radiance of Transmission or the menace of Exercise One as just a few examples.

 

Closer, STILL and Unknown Pleasures (in that order), alongside the Transmission 7" & 12", LWTUA 7" & 12" and the HATYM Video received almost constant attention right to the present day.  The excellent 'An Ideal For Living' book and the Joy Division - A History in Cuttiings (long since missing!) provided much needed information in filling in the history of the band.  Later day releases of the Joy Division - John Peel Sessions and the Substance compilation served to feed my ever insatiable appetite. 

 

When the Heart and Soul Box-set was released I was simply numb.  For years I had listended to the official Joy Division releases (the only bootleg tape I owned was the Eindhoven gig) never imagining a 4 disc set containing a plethora of demos, sessions and live tracks would ever be released.  I owned it for 3 months before I actually played it.  It was akin to the book which cannot be put down but on the other hand you do not want to finish it.  I was almost in a daz on the first listen.  I actually held my breath when listening to Chance (Atmosphere) from the Piccadilly Radio Session.  I imagined that this was how it must feel to be the first person to discover an ancient and long lost treasure.  Sometimes I think that words do not do justice to the emotion of the music of Joy Division.

 

'Touching From A Distance' and 'Torn Apart' were vital reading in the overall picture and I enjoyed both of them immensly.  Peter Hook's 'Unknown Pleasures' and Paul Morley's 'Piece by Piece' is also enjoyed (although not to everyones choice) in equal amounts.  'Control' was a strange one for me, mainly because I felt (and still do as it happens) that Ian Curtis was a very complex character, and that a film drama simply cannot describe the complexities and vortex in which that man found himself.  The Grant Gee documentary on the other hand, is in my opinion the benchmark....I love watching that.

 

Music is a huge part of my life and in my opinion it is the purest form of self expression.  However, the personal intensity of Ian Curtis lyrics remain almost without exception as the most heartfelt and beautiful words to accompany music I have heard in all my years of listening.  But there is more to it than that....Joy Division are a complete package, and that is to me at least, what sets them apart.  Propelled by Stephen Morris, Peter Hook and Bernard Sumner, managed by Rob Gretton, studio engineered by the unique Martin Hannett and packaged by Peter Saville.  Against this backdrop, working for Factory Recored under Tony Wilson, the music of Joy Division is a work of art.  To this day, I pick up the vinly of 'Closer' and admire the stunning artwork, the minimalistic presentation of the sleeve, and the power of the music inside.....the intensity of that album still knocks me every time I hear it.......

Why Joy Division?......no other band have come close........and I am sure that no other band ever will.....

 

 

dmxi

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Reply with quote  #20 
nice read!
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